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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
and rwanda's support of congolese rebels. this is a little more than 2-1/2 hours. >> we will come to order and good afternoon. i apologize for the lateness in starting. today's hearing will examine u.s. policy in the democratic republic of congo, this was exacerbated by rwanda's intervention in neighboring eastern congo as documented by the release of three united nations reports this year. these reports confirm rwanda's support of militias who have ravaged and continue to plague this region. the state's--unable to testify at the sept. 19 hearing on this issue. the subcommittee promised to follow up was available to testify. the aftermath of the genocide, the administration turned a blind eye to reports of rwanda and plundering of resources from the d r c and support for rebels who have devastated eastern congo and its people. built over the clinton administration's causal failure responding effectively to the genocide in rwanda has led his subsequent u.s. administration being reluctant to criticize the government of rwanda. with these u.n. reports on that behavior, we must overcome our re
the opportunity meet with the president of rwanda. did the officials with whom you met with, did they meet, i should say, it's a dispute that? and went secretary sherman met with the president, some months back, several weeks back, did she get a report back from him? did he tell her this is all rubbish, not true? or did he admit to anything? secondly one of my most disappointed waste today, and marino i think are you out further on the suspension of foreign military financing that we're talking about on $200,000, when the 2006 act at least envision a more robust and credible sanctions against the country that is aiding and abetting that there is organizations like m23. so if you could speak to whether or not additional sanctions are under consideration at least against rwanda, and specific individuals as well. >> mr. chairman, let me ask, answer the first question. you were correct, as i stated earlier, i and my british and french colleagues met for several hours with the president, and we met for an extended period of time with the other president has was the foreign minister and prime minis
, rwanda's support for military financing has been suspended. we will continue to monitor reports of an external support and respond appropriately, including reviewing our assistance. we are working with our partners and the drc to develop a comprehensive approach that addresses all three elements, the congolese defense forces, military justice, and the police. we must work to develop a more professional forces that respect human rights and protect territorial integrity in population. the defense department has provided training to the congolese military, including training of a light infantry battalion in 2010. sexual and gender based violence prevention and training were incorporated in every aspect of this effort. in addition to the ongoing training, the defense department's as included logistics, exercise participation, basic military intelligence training, humanitarian assistance and he military action. moving forward, the defense department stands ready to work with our colleagues to determine the best way ahead including providing additional infantry training. the scale of
brief. this working and training local communities for self protection was done in rwanda against the fdlr. i am not so sure about doing this in the congo. it is attractive to me, but i guess i would say it depends on the community. i would say the key here is to engage and embrace the congolese government at the most senior level, but not just the presidential level, which is why i keep talking about some kind of by national commission. then you can start penetrating those ministries which have the responsibility, even bring governors over so that you can do at the provincial level. i guess i think that the real heavy lift here is more on the diplomatic side, and working very carefully with the congolese government, which is essentially isolated and does not have much contact with our officials i remember about the army that was not paid -- officials. >> i remember about an army that was not paid. that says an awful lot about the nature and character of society. i think we all agree that if you have a security solution, but does not sit with the situation on the ground, it will s
genocide in rwanda. they raped hundreds of women, chopping apart michildren, massacre of people. that's who the government is teaming up with. congo is really this -- it's like this caldron of abuse on a scale that's unlike just about anywhere else in the world. i cover a number of these conflicts in africa. just about everywhere else things are changing or getting a bit better in some cases. congo has stayed the same for almost ten years and that same is very disturbing state of anarchy. >> congo has enormous resources and the a beautiful lush country. >> it's spectacular. it's one of the most beautiful places i've been ever where. there was a huge volcano with streams of smoke shooting out of it. it's very lush. it's very fertile. the lakes are beautiful. the environment is clean. it's blessed with mineral riches, gold, timber, copper. just about everything. that's part of the reason why we're seeing this fight. the u.s. government has tried to get their hands around this by passing this resource conflict legislation that tries to get their arms around better regulating the minerals that
on the conflict in the democratic republic of congo. and rwanda's involvement in that country. u.n. security council experts alleged rwanda support of rebels against the congolese army after last month's cease of the city of gomea by a rebel military group. that hearing by house foreign affairs subcommittee will begin live at 3:00 p.m. eastern. you can see it on c-span3. also a look at the republican party in the 113th congress. hear remarks from republican congressman jim jordan and steve scalise on the future of the conservative movement. they'll be speaking 3:30 eastern right here on c-span. >> belittle me. strangle me. >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us i think in this country, we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this if he none none that so many of us -- phenomenon that so many of us experienced one way or another and had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people will starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of g
happening. after what has happened in rwanda in the 1990's, and in bosnia, the international community came up with an excellent idea after that, in establishing the international criminal court in july of 2002. after that, the responsibility is to protect in 2005. after that, the international community will understand that if a state cannot commit crimes against its own people. should the international community -- the syrian case officially approve that all of this discussion and all of that was untrue. we have been seeing crimes against humanity. we have been seeing war crimes committed by the regime, day-by- day. children, women -- we see all the time torture. children are being tortured. we have been seeing cases of rape in different areas. we have seen a systematic and widespread policy of targeting organization figures and leaders. these are crimes against amenity. -- humanity. despite all of that, we have five special sessions of the u.n. human rights council in geneva. they come up with strong resolutions that what is happening in syria are crimes against humanity. they establish
hurdle on the coleco rwanda would lead them to fight even if they lose damascus and as they put additional pressures on the unity of the syrian state and we certainly do not want to see the syrian state disintegrate. it goes back into this question of how to convince the community that it has a role in the future of syria like others in their doesn't have to be a genocide. i was struck by the editorial or an opinion piece in "the new york times" i think at the beginning of last week for the week before about the next genocide being against allowites, and that fear is present among the community members and so what you are talking about is just an extension of that and the way around it is the political solution the longer the violence goes on, the more extremist groups benefit and based on what we have seen of no sort of parent organization, al qaeda and iraqi will not be merciful at all so it is incumbent on us to bolster what in the political opposition which is what we are trying to do. >> thank you, ambassador woo-hoo when you say the regime is numbered is that proverbial or
weapon ban, so-called. every gun is an assault weapon. the machetes in uganda, or i'm sorry, rwanda, the worst genocide that we know of in human history. 800,000 or so, with a ma -- with machetes. of course we know during world war ii, the genocide wasn't just 800,000, it was millions. six million jews, killed by all kinds of means. so we need to be smart about the way we deal with this issue of mass murders and violence in our society. everything should be on the table. and as we continue to remember the loved ones of those who were victims of the tragedy at newtown, connecticut, things go on here in this town. this body, we've been alerted tomorrow, will vote on what's being called plan b. plan a was to try to reach an agreement with the president. but from my experience as an attorney, i've negotiated small deals, multimillion dollar deals, i have certified -- i was district judge, chief justice, certified mediator, i don't know if there's anybody else in the congressional body that's been through the training and process of becoming an international arbitrator. and a lot of expe
statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranked no. 1. if you look around the markets, you will see the authority. 90% of the world's population. they're going to see improvements in those lives. there will be issues, but the story is very strong and that is why we are seeing the story being very positive. >> tell us about the frontier markets because you cite the story of capital labor productivity. it will explode very dramatically? >> i think there is a clear delineation between the advanced emerging economies and the frontier economies, but our related or integrated it is to the developed market, how much exposure do they have? in terms of trade and foreign direct investment, it is heavily dependent on the united states and europe. africa has 1 billion people and is less than 2% of world trade or direct investment. the real engine of growth is not going to be trade, unfortunately. if you look at valuations of the bank's and trading in the local market, the story is credible and hits to the story rather than be
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)